Archive for the ‘Summer Workshop’ Category

Project #6, Debbie Maddy from Calico Carriage Designs

July 26, 2008

Please welcome Debbie Maddy from  Calico Carriage Designs is her website and her blog

Needlework or Jewelry Bag

photo1.jpg

My hostess at a workshop in Angleton, Texas taught me the basics for this little bag.  Please read all directions before starting this project.

Supplies:

  • Fabric – 2 coordinating fat quarters
  • 2 yds of 1/4″ ribbon or cord
  • Disappearing marking pen or chalk
  • Sewing machine
  • Basic sewing supplies
  • Yarn needle or safety pin.

Cut a 14″ and 7″ square from each fat quarter. Place the two 14″ squares right sides together. Sew 1/4″ from outside edge on both leaving about 3″ open on one side.

photo2.jpg
Clip corners and turn right side out. Turn the open edge in 1/4″ and press all edges flat. Stitch close to the edges around the whole block. If you have an edge stitch foot, it helps to keep the stitching straight.

photo3.jpg

The top stitching will close the openings. Repeat for the 7″ squares. Use a chalk wheel or disappearing marking pen to mark a line corner to corner in both directions on the top side of the small square. Fold the large square in half and finger press in both directions to find the center. Place the small square in the center of the large square. The fabric that will be the inside of the bag should be facing up with the contrasting side of the small square facing up.

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Sew on the marked lines in both directions, backstitching at the corners. Turn the squares over and measure 5″ in from each corner. Fold the corners back.

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Mark a line 1/2″ from the corner edges and stitch on the lines back-stitching at the beginning and ending.

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Cut the ribbon into two pieces. Thread ribbon into yarn needle

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or safety pin and weave it through the channels created by the stitching. Leave tails of ribbon on one side and tie the ends together with a knot. Run the other ribbon through, leaving tails on the opposite side.

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Pull the knots on both sides to draw up the square to form a small bag. The square inside will make small pockets to organize contents.

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The little pouch looks like a flower when viewed from the top.

photo1.jpg

Thank you Debby! That is so darn cute 🙂

Tomorrow,  Karen West from Thimble Pleasures I hope you’re having a good time!

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Project #5, Beaded Stitch Markers from Karen Gass of Cotton Spice

July 25, 2008

I’m pretty new to beading, so if I can do these… so can you!And if you don’t knit, put an earring thing on this instead of a ring. See? I don’t even know the proper words for ‘things’! 🙂

stitch-markers-finished.jpg

1 – Gather your supplies – various beads, jump rings and some 24 gauge wire.

sm-supplies.jpg

2 – Cut a piece of wire 3″ long. Slightly bend this wire in half, not all the way. Slide on a lavender bead. Make sure it’s in the middle, and then twist the wire to keep it there.

sm-one.jpg

3 – Arrange your beads the way you like them

sm-two.jpg

4 – Then, using your pliers, bend that wire a little more than 90 degrees and place a jump ring on

sm-three.jpg

5 – Using your fingers and your pliers to help out, wrap the wire around itself, to secure the beads and the jump ring.

sm-four.jpg

6 – Wrapping does take a little bit of practice, but it gets easier each time you do it. The most important thing in my mind, is to make sure the ends are not poking out to snag yarn… or hair (if you decide to make earrings)

sm-five.jpg

7 – I made 4 of these, and then made 2 smaller versions. Sometimes you need a different marker to mark the beginning of the round, so there are 2 here to choose from.

stitch-markers-finished.jpg

There you go! These are quick and easy. Oh… and they’ll be one of the prizes I’ll be giving away at the end! Be sure to leave your comments 🙂

Tomorrow…Debbie Maddy from Calico Carriage Quilt Designs

Project #4, Quilted Prayer Journal from TK Harrison of BOMquilts.com

July 24, 2008

Click here for these instructions in PDF

Click here for these instructions in PDF

 

Project #3, Stamped Fabric from Daphne Greig

July 23, 2008

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  Welcome Daphne, who has discovered a super way to make some unique fabric…

 

Stamping Fabric with Daphne

 I wanted to make a small quilt with some motifs cut from a medium-scale print.

fussy-cut.jpg


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To accent the design I chose a purple and lavender stripe fabric but needed another print for the cornerstones of my design.

accent-stripe.jpg

 


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I had an orange fabric that would do but what I really wanted was something with orange AND purple. I decided to stamp the orange fabric to have the right colour combination.

 

I chose two stamps – a spiral and a triangle spiral. They are both small stamps that would be the correct size for a cornerstone square for my sashing/cornerstone arrangement. This is the triangle stamp.

triangle.jpg


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I like Jacquard’s Lumiere paint. It has a bit of sparkle and I chose the Pearl Violet colour. I squeezed a small amount of paint onto a paper plate and then added a few drops of water to thin it slightly.

 

 

 lumiere.jpg


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The easiest way to apply the paint to the stamp is with a small sponge. You can see a bit of the sparkle in the paint here.

sponge.jpg


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Then dab the sponge onto the stamp, being sure that all the raised areas are evenly coated with the paint.

spiral.jpg


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I pre-cut the small 1½?squares for the cornerstones and then carefully stamped in the middle of each square. I was careful to press the stamp evenly to get a complete spiral. I stamped 4 small squares with the spiral stamp and the remaining small squares with the triangle spiral stamp

triangle-stamped.jpg


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I washed the paint off the stamps right after I stamped the fabric. I used soap and water and a small brush to remove all the paint.

 washing-stamp.jpg


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And here is the finished quilt.

finished-quilt.jpg

 

Tomorrow, we’ll be having Tammy Harrision with a Quilted Prayer Journal! Tell your friends!!

 

Project #2, Knitted Headband from Rambling Designs

July 22, 2008

Please welcome Bridgett from Rambling Designs  She is such a talented knitter, and you’ll be seeing more of her around here, believe me!


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First off: Thank you Karen for letting me participate in this wonderful project! What a great idea! When I got your email, I had right away numerous projects pop up in my head now to pick one and write the pattern!

It took me a while to figure out how to knit these little flowers, so they come out just the way I want them. Once that was done, I hit the ground running and could not stop myself. Headband… what now? Why, a belt of course!!!! And barrettes for my daughters hair… and and and and….

You can figure out what else one could make out of these little things. Maybe a chocker necklace? Hippie-fy your house: Make a long chain of flowers,  as a happy summer garland to spice up a window, or a favorite chair… sew some around a table cloth? Make flowers in different colors and work them around a tie back, or glue them on a Barrett. Make a flower circle just big enough to go around your iced tea glasses, to keep the fingers dry from the condensation of the cold liquid in the glass and make matching tiny flowers, to go on the drinking straw, for the summer party, to distinguish glasses…. Great for scraps: Use up bits and pieces of leftover yarn, make more than just one row and turn it into an Afghan! (I think I will try this idea next!)

Have fun, try and make the belt out of unusual materials, eg. Try using thin strips of tulle, or any other pretty fabric for the flowers. Or use cut up plastic bags, ribbon, raffia, wool (and then felt them), or whatever else comes to mind.

Soooooo many possibilities! Make them big, make them small, but most important of all: HAVE  FUN making them! 

Yarn: bits of yarn in your favorite color (I used some leftover sugar’n crème yarn I had around the house)

Needles: a size or two smaller then what matches the yarn (I used Chrystal palace bamboo needles in size US 3. The size is a bit smaller then what is called for on the ball band, with the result that the flowers are bit tighter and not so “floppy?. If you like yours floppy, use big needles)

Notions: yarn needle, piece of string in contrasting color, optional: beads to fit the yarn you are using

Gauge: not important

Time needed: the headband can be made in an afternoon; the belt might take a bit longer. It all depends on how fast you knit 😉

head.JPG

 

Notes: you have to decide for yourself, which side is the right side of your flowers. You can wear them either way, with the knit stitch side up or with the rippled purl stitch side up. I opted for the purl stitch side to be the right side (I like the texture), but attached all the flowers together with wrong sides (knit stitch side) facing. You can vary the flower size; just use different yarn or different size needles.

Abbreviations:

Co = dast on

Sl = slip stitch

K = knit stitch/es

P = purl stitch/es

Approx. = approximately

Knitted cast on method:

Start out with one slip stitch on your left hand needle.*Insert right hand needle from front to back in first stitch on needle (counting from the tip). Pull up loop, do not drop old stitch off left hand needle, sl new stitch made in front of first stitch. Rep from* as many times as instructed.

Instructions:

For headband: Take a measurement around the head where this headband will go.

For belt: take a measurement around hips and add 2 inches so the belt will sit nice and relaxed on your hips. This belt is not to hold up your pants, but to look cooooooool. J

First flower:

Co 1

Row 1: With knitted cast on method co 6 stitches (7 stitches on needle =1 base stitch and 6 cast on stitches)

Row 2: k1, put string in the contrasting color in between stitch just worked and next stitch, k5

Row 3: p6

Row 4: k7 pass second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth stitch one after the other over first stitch, now sl last stitch back on left hand needle. Insert right hand needle in marked space between the two stitches, remove marker,  sl stitch from left hand needle on to right hand needle and lift the marked stitch over the stitch in front.

This will curve the little bit of knitting. There should only be one stitch left on your right hand needles.

Row 5: Sl stitch back on left hand needle.

Rep rows 1-5 three more times, then repeat row 1-4 once.  Do not sl the stitch back on to the left hand needle.

Instead:  Make sure all petals face the same direction. With knit stitch side facing: insert the right hand needle in the base of the first “petal?, pull up a loop, and pull through stitch on right hand needle to form all 6 petals in to a ring. Cut thread and pull all the way through that last stitch.

You can tie the two ends now in a knot if you like and leave them until you are done and sew all ends in at the same time, or just sew every end in right away. 

Every following flower: Work first four petals as for first flower

Fifth petal: With one stitch on right hand needle and knitted cast on method, co 3 stitches, take previously finished flower and with the knit stitch side facing you insert right hand needle from back to front at the center of the edge of a petal and through last stitch on left hand needle. Co 1 stitch and pull through petal on needle before you put the new stitch on left hand needle, (now you should have 5 stitches on your left hand needle, the “base stitch? and the 4 newly co stitches for the new petal.) With knitted cast on method, co 2 more stitches. Proceed with rest of petal as established.

Sixth petal: With one stitch on right hand needle and knitted cast on method, co 2 stitches, , take previously finished flower and with the knit stitch side facing you insert right hand needle from back to front at the center of the edge of a petal and through last stitch on left hand needle. Co 1 stitch and pull through petal on needle before you put the new stitch on left hand needle , now you should have 4 stitches on your left hand needle, the “base stitch? and the 3 newly co stitches for the new petal. With knitted cast on method, co 3 more stitches. Proceed with rest of petal as established.

Close to ring in order to fashion flower as previously.

You will have to make sure that from now on you attach the flowers in a straight line, so look which two petals you have to attach them from here on out, so it will result in a straight chain.

If you opted for the headband: Work flowers and fit them together until chain measures 2/3 of head circumference. Proceed with next step

If you opted for the belt –version: work flowers until you reach the measurement taken at beginning, proceed with next step

Next Step:

Pick up one stitch on one end of the flower chain between two petals.

For Headband:

Row 1: K1 stitch

Rep row 1 until cord measures approx. 10 inches. Bind off as follows: pull up a loop through the stitch, cut thread and pull loop all the way through the stitch.

Rep this for other side. Sew in ends block slightly.

Or replace the knitted tie with a pretty ribbon tied in between two petals of the last flowers on each side.

For belt:

Row 1: k1 through front and back loop (2 stitches)

Row 2: k1, k1 through front and back of loop (3 stitches)

Work 3 stitch I-cord for approx. 12 inches, bind off all stitches, cut end.  You can put a bead on the end and tie a knot if you like

You can also just cut 3 pieces of yarn and braid them on the flower chain for the belt ties (remember the cut pieces have to be 3 times the length you want the finished tie to be), or just tie a few lengths of yarn to the end of the flower chain and put beads on each end. Sort of like a loooooong tassel and use it to tie the belt.

Rep this step for other side.

Weave in ends, blocking is not really necessary, enjoy!

 


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Donnelly Blue Rose was originally scheduled for today, but she was injured in a car accident. She’s getting better, but her project will be delayed until July 31.Send her your prayers and good thoughts!

Tomorrow….Daphne Greig is going to show you some awesome things to do with fabric!

Project #1, Angela McIntyre from Laughing Cat Designs

July 21, 2008

Welcome Angela! Visit her website and her blog. Today, she brings us Wearable Fiber Art Pins….


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I love fiber art, especially when it is wearable.  However, finding the time to make a Wearable Art jacket or vest can be a challenge.  In order to wear my fiber art creations, I had to make them smaller, more of an accent than a whole look.  So, I came up with a way to make fiber art jewelry!  Now I can look the part, with very little time and effort, and materials. Use up all those wonderful scraps!

 

With the Fiber Art Pin I can now accent my entire wardrobe in whatever color combination I want.  I can also go for whatever look I want, from folk art with wool and buttons to a very elegant Asian using silk and dynasty coins.  Whatever your look, you can make one of these fun pins in just a few hours, or even better, make several at once!

 

 picture-1.jpg

 


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Here is how I do it:

 

Supplies needed:

  • Fast2Fuse heavy weight (or Timtex with fusible will work) 2? – 3? square.
  • Misty Fuse
  • Fabric scraps: cotton, tulle, organza, funky fabrics, silks, etc.  anything goes
  • Fun Stuff: beads, buttons, decorative yarn and thread, doodads, Angelina fibers
  • Sewing machine
  • Beading thread and needle (I use Silamide beading thread, and a Soft Touch beading needle)
  • Appliqué pressing sheet (or Teflon pressing sheet)
  • Clear or smoke monofilament thread (I use Monopoly by Superior Threads)
  • Pin back
  • Gem-Tac adhesive

 

picture2.jpg

 

 


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Create the Base:

 

On the appliqué pressing sheet, fuse a background fabric to your Fast2Fuse.  This shouldn’t be your focus fabric; you may end up covering it all up with additional fabrics and ‘fun stuff’.  (The appliqué pressing sheet is used because there is fusible on both sides of the Fast2Fuse and we don’t want this stuck to our ironing boards!)

 

picture-3.jpg

 


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Audition different accent fabrics, organza, silk, etc on your background.  Strips, ripped, fussy cut, it doesn’t matter.  Most of the time I use free form cut fabric, torn tulle, fused Angelina fibers that are torn or cut, etc.  Use the Misty Fuse on the wrong side of your accent fabrics before you cut them up.  When cool, cut them as desired and fuse your choices to the background fabric.  (*TIP: use parchment paper and your appliqué pressing sheet to fuse the Misty Fuse to your fabrics and Angelina sheets!)

 

picture-4.jpg

 


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Using your sewing machine and decorative threads, stitch randomly across the fabrics to attach them and add texture.  A straight stitch is all that is needed, but sometimes it is fun to use your machine’s build in decorative stitches.  Even a basic zigzag stitch can jazz things up a bit.  Use a neutral cotton in the bobbin.

 

 picture-5.jpg

 


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Switch to a clear or smoke monofilament thread to add a few decorative yarns.  Simply zigzag across them with a walking foot using a long stitch (3.5 length is what I use).  Only a few inches of yarn will be needed and I tend to save leftover bits from other projects in a bag.  When I create small pieces like this, I can dump out my scrap bag of yarn and use up those little bits up.

 

   picture-6a.jpg  picture-6b.jpg

 


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picture-8a.jpg   picture-8b.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

 

 

The Fun Stuff:

 

Thread your beading needle with a beading thread and knot the end.  You can pop the knot into the inside of the piece just like with hand quilting, or you can hide the knot under a piece of yarn.  Take an extra stitch where your first bead will go, to give extra security, and then you can begin stitching on beads.  First sew your accent or focus beads on, then add seed beads around them.  Be sure to either ‘travel’ between the layers, or take very tiny stitches on the back, so your threads don’t show.  (*TIP: using a busy fabric on the back will help to hide stitches!)

 

 picture-9a.jpg   picture-9b.jpg  picture-9c.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Create drops and dangles by stringing many smaller beads first, then an accent bead, then a ‘stop bead’.  Thread back up through all the beads, skipping the stop bead, and into the piece securing with a hidden knot. 

 

picture-10a.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Add as many or few beads and doodads as you wish. 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Finishing:

 

Once all the embellishing is done, you need to add a pin back.  First squeeze a line of glue where you want the pin back to go.  Open up the pin back and lay it onto the line of glue, pressing it in.  Add more glue around and over the pin back.  Allow to dry completely before wearing.  24 hours is recommended.

 

 

picture-11a.jpg   picture-11b.jpg  picture-11c.jpg

 

 

picture-12.jpg

 

Thank you Angela, these are SO cute!!! If any of you make some these, share the pictures with us. Post your pictures on your Flickr or Photobucket acct, then share the links with us in the Comments!

 

New Project tomorrow….

 

I think I forgot to mention the Prizes!!! Yup, I sure did 🙂 Leave your comments… we’ll have a drawing at the end of the Workshop and send out some prizes!