Archive for the ‘Gift Countdown’ Category

Winners picked…

December 7, 2008

I have picked our 3 winners, using a random number generator.

20 – Sue

24 – Ruthie

33 – Sandy

I’m emailing all three of you. Your prizes are all hand made, I’ve been working on them this week, and they should go in the mail tomorrow!

Since it’s Christmas, I’m not posting pictures of what you’re getting 🙂 You’ll have to wait until it arrives at your home!

Once I know you’ve received it, let me know, and I’ll post a picture here.

Congrats ladies! 🙂

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From Barbara at Six Gables Designs

December 5, 2008


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Please welcome Barbara and her very cool – or should I say ‘hot’ – casserole tote!

 

casserole3.jpg

 

Casserole/Plate Tote

 

Shared by Barbara Chojnacki of Six Gables Designs

 

Choose two coordinating prints, or use up your leftover fabrics. Bring one loaded with goodies to a holiday party and leave it behind as a hostess gift. This is a fun, quick, and easy project.

 

MATERIALS:

 

5/8 yard each of two fabrics, fabric A and fabric B

 

circle of quilt batting 20? in diameter

 

8 nylon or metal rings, approximately 1? in diameter (if you can’t find rings in the craft department, split ring key rings will work)

 

 

DIRECTIONS: Cut fabrics in order given; start cutting as close to corner as you can, so you have enough fabric for subsequent pieces. All seams are 1/4?.

 

Carrier base:

Cut a 20? diameter circle each from fabrics A and B. Place fabric A face down on table. Top with batting and fabric B face up. Quilt straight lines dividing the circle into eight pie-shaped pieces.

 

Handles:

From Fabric A cut two strips 2 1/2? wide x width of fabric (approx. 44?). Fold each strip in half lengthwise, right sides together. Stitch along one short end and down long edge.

Turn right side out, press.

 

Binding:

From Fabric B cut 3 bias strips 2 1/2? wide. Join into one long strip at least 70? long. Fold in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. Press.

 

Loops for rings: Make 8

From Fabric B cut 8 pieces 2 1/2? x 5?. Fold in half lengthwise, right sides together and stitch along long edge. Turn right side out, press.

 

casserole2.jpg

 

Assembly:

Slip a ring onto each 5? strip, fold strip in half. Pin to edge of base as shown in Picture 2, matching raw edges of strips with raw edges of base, and aligning with quilt lines. Pin loops evenly around outer edge of base, facing in toward center of base as shown, stitch securely a scant 1/4? from edge. Bind base with bias binding. Slip on handle through four adjacent rings, securely stitch ends of handle together. Repeat with second handle through remaining four rings.

 

This brings our Last Minute Gift Countdown to a close for this year. I hope you found some fabulous ideas for gifts! We’ll have another blog project next summer…our Summer Workshop!

 

I know I never mentioned anything about prizes… but ya’ll know me well enough to know there will be Prizes!!! I’ll pick names on Saturday, so you didn’t leave a comment on a post you loved, you still have time!

 

3 Prizes! I have no idea what they will be, but they’ll be GREAT! It’s Christmas after all, I love to give presents!!

 

 

From Bridgett at Rambling Designs

December 4, 2008


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Please welcome my friend, Bridgett at Rambling Designs Be sure to visit her blog, she’s got some awesome designs!!!

 

THE HAT

hat.jpg

This hat was dreamt up.. Literally! I do dream of fiber, yarn and knitting.

This hat mingled itself into my dreams, it was persistent… it would not go away!

Night after night it came back until I finally broke down and cast on.  I only knew what it was supposed to look like when it was done, but after the first few rows it all fell into place as if it was meant to be.

So here now, without further ado:

THE HAT!

Yarn: Red heart carefree cotton 1 ball (I wanted something “easy care?.. you could use handspun yarn too, as I will for the next one I am going to make)

Needles: US size 7 set of 4 dpn and a set of straights or circular (whatever you prefer) in the same size. Crochet hook in matching size (optional)

Notions: Yarn needle, 2 1 ¼ inch buttons, stitch marker, different color string, or row marke

This pattern is written to fit 22 inches head circumference. It does stretch a bit further then that, but if you need it much larger then that you have to add inches to the first strip of knitting and pick up more stitches for the crown.  (Remember: bigger hat= more yarn!)

Abbreviations:

Co =cast on

K  =knit/knit stitch

P  =purl/purl stitch

Rep  =repeat

Tbl  = through back loop

Wyif  = with yarn in front

K2tog  = knit the next two stitches together

 

Instructions:

With straight Needles (or the circular ones depending on what you chose) cast on 23 stitches

Row 1: k1tbl, k across to last stitch, sl1wyif turn (RS Row)

Row 2: k1tbl, p across to last stitch, sl1wyif

Rep. row 1 and 2 each 4 more times (10 rows all together)

Row 11: k1tbl, p to last stitch, sl1wyif, turn (RS Row) (mark this row with a different color string, this is the row where the bind off edge will be sewn to)

Row 12: k1tbl, *k1, p1, rep from* across to last stitch, sl1wyif, turn

Rep.  row 12 another 123 times or until piece measures aprox. 20 3/2 inches from cast on edge. End after completing a WS Row)

Bind off all stitches as follows:

K1, k1, pass first stitch over second, k1, rep from* until all stitches have been worked off.

Cut thread and leave about 10 inch tail to sew. Should you want a smaller/bigger hat, just stop when (or keep on going until) you have reach about 3 inches shorter (negative ease) then the head’s circumference you are making this hat for

You will now sew the bind off edge to row 11 (not to the cast on edge!!!!)to make a circle. Make sure you only sew in the back of the knitting so you won’t see the seam in front and don’t twist the strip!

There should be a stockinet stitch “flap? when you are done. You can “tack? it down a bit with a few stitches, make sure they stay invisible on the back side of the “flap?) or you can just leave it the way it is for now. The buttons will be sewn on to this flap, when the hat is done.

With right side of the circle facing you, pick up and knit 60 stitches evenly around circumference lace a marker at beginning of round. Divide Stitches evenly on 3 dpn (20 stitches on each), (if you are making a smaller/bigger hat, you will have to pick up less/more stitches here! And the sequence in which you decrease might differ a little; it might not be k8 k2tog unless you have a number that works with this sequence)

K  5 rounds plain

Now you will start the decrease for the crown of the hat as follows:

Next round (Round 1): *k8, k2tog, rep from* around

 Round 2 and all even numbered Rounds: K 1 round plain

Round 3: *k7, k2tog, rep from* around

Round 5: *k6, k2tog, rep from* around

Round 7: *k5, k2 tog, rep from* around

Round 9: *k4, k2tog, rep from* around

Round 11:*k3, k2tog, rep from* around

Round 13: *k2, k2tog, rep from* around

Round 15: k1 k2tog, rep from* around (=4 stitches on each needle)

Cut thread, leave about 10 inch tail, with yarn needle thread Yarn through all stitches on all needles twice, remove needles, pull  yarn and stitches tight together, thread the yarn end to the inside of the hat. Sew in all ends; sew on the buttons to the stockinet stitch “flap? (should the flap curl a bit, just tack it down with a few stitches, if you haven’t already done so).

If you feel like it, you can use the crochet hook and work one row of crab stitch evenly around the bottom edge of the hat as follows:

With right side of hat facing you, pull up a loop through any stitch on the edge of the hat.*Move hook to the next stitch to the right and pull up a second loop, now catch yarn and pull through both loops on the hook, rep from* around, close round with a slip stitch. Sew in ends.

Now put on your new hat, a warm coat and go for a walk in the beautiful winter countryside!

 

 Don’t forget! We’ll have a new project tomorrow! 

 P.S. Bridgett and her family are in the middle of a long distance move, so you may not see this project on her blog, but it’s worth the trip just to see her knitting. Awesome! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Gudrun at Gudrun’s World

December 2, 2008

Please welcome Gudrun, from Chanhassen, Minnesota…
Wine Glass Coasters – Tutorial

 

20 This project is a very fun one to do as christmas gifts, hostess gifts or just for yourself and your next holiday party. It is a part of The Cottonspice “Last minute christmas countdown” I am a part of over at the Cotton Spice blog.

Supplies for 1 coaster

Center fabric cut into One 2-1/4″ square.

Border fabric cut into Two 2-1/4″ x 2″ rectangles and Two 2″ x 5-1/4″ rectangles.

Backing fabric cut into One 5-1/2″ square.

Binding fabric cut into a 1-1/2″ wide, 15″ long bias strip. (see directions below)

Ric Rac, cut into approximately Two 5″ long units.

1

After cutting your pieces out, layer the backing and batting together, with the wrong side of the fabric next to the batting.

4

Pick thread that matches the color of your backing and binding because you will be quilting the coasters as you go.

5

Layer the square in the middle of the batting, right sides up. Lay a 2-1/4″ x 2″ border rectangle, right sides together on the edge of the square.

6

With your walking foot on your machine (preferably), sew a 1/4″ from the edge of the fabrics, through all layers. When beginning and ending each seam, take a few stitches in the same place to secure threads.

8

Press away from the center. Repeat with another border rectangle on the other side and press.

9

Now layer a 2″ x 5-1/4″ border rectangle on the long side of the sewn unit, right sides together. Sew through all the layers along the edge as before and press away from the center. Repeat for the other side.

10

Now find a circular object (I used a mug) that is about 1″ larger on each side than the foot of your wine glass. Mark the circle with a pen or chalk as shown. Then cut it out with scissors.

11

Lay the two pieces of Ric Rac across the center of the coaster as shown and pin in place.

2

Now it is time for your bias binding. To cut the bias strips, lay your ruler on top of at least a 1/3 yard cut of fabric so that the 45 degree line on the ruler is lined up with the top of the fabric as shown. Make your first cut there.

3

Then cut a 1-1/2″ strip from that bias edge. Your bias strip needs to be at least 15″ long.

12

Press the bias edge a 1/4″ under and then Press one edge of the bias strip a 1/4″ under as shown.

13

You will be sewing the binding to the back of the coaster. Pin the folded end of the strip to the edge of the coaster, the first 2″. That is where you start sewing. Stitch the binding to the back of the coaster, about a 1/4″ from the edge, aligning the binding to the rounded edge as you go.

14

When you come to the pinned part, keep sewing until you have sewn far enough to overlap the binding at least 1″.

15

Clip the excess binding strip at an angle matching the angle of the sewn end of the strip and finish sewing all the way around.

16

Slip the unfinished end into the slit up top, press the binding and flip it around to the front.

17

Adjust the binding and pin the opening shut as shown.

18

Sew the binding down with a decorative stitch, I used a kind of a snowflake stitch, using my darling Viking.

20

Slip the foot of your wineglass between the ric rac, fill it with your favorite wine and drink up!! Now you will never loose your coaster again, this will totally take care of the sipping spillage (oops, maybe I should have made mine red!) which are two problems I tend to have all the time. If I could now design something that will tie my hand to the class because I tend to loose it all the time and end up with 3 or 4 at every party!!! Cheers….Skál….Salut….

GIVEAWAY……….What would my first tutorial need to be followed by…yes a giveaway is in order…on top of that, it´s almost my birthday. (jebbs, you guessed it, I am turning 29….again) I will be giving away a big teaser…..some fabric from my newest fabric line, Journey that won´t be in stores until next year!!!! All you have to do is leave me a comment about the first tutorial, why you really need to have some of the new fabric or even give me some names of your favorite wine. At the moment I have been really getting into Spanish wines, especially Tempranillos….mmmm. I think I just might have to pour me one right now to celebrate the first project tutorial.

From Traci at Plumcute Designs

November 26, 2008

Please welcome Traci, she is one of my favorite stitchery designers!

needlekeeper1.jpg


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Last Minute Gift Countdown Needlekeeper

by Plumcute Designs

This year has been the year of the pincushion & needlekeeper here at Plumcute Designs.  In keeping with that spirit, I whipped up this little project for you.  It’s fast, fun, & sure to delight!

 

Supplies:

black wool 5 x 7½

cream wool 4 x 5½

green wool 7 x 6

scrap of red wool

2-inch square of black polka-dot

fusible

one small snap

one small button

coordinating threads

basic sewing supplies

 

Cutting Requirements:

cut black wool to measure exactly 5 x 7½

cut cream wool to measure exactly 4 x 5½

cut green wool to measure 7 x 4 ½ 

cut 2 holly leaves from trimmed excess

cut a 1-inch circle from your red wool

following the manufacturers directions, cut a 1½-inch circle from black polka-dot

 

 

 



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Putting Your Needlekeeper Together:

-center & fuse your black polka-dot circle to one 4½-inch end of cream wool

-blanket stitch around black polka-dot circle to secure it to cream wool

-center red wool 1-inch circle onto black polka-dot circle

-center small button onto 1-inch red wool circle

-sew button & red wool circle to black polka-dot circle

-center cream wool rectangle onto black wool rectangle and using a contrasting thread color blanket stitch together.  This is the outside of your needlekeeper

 

-for the inside of your needlekeeper, you will center green wool rectangle onto backside of black wool rectangle and -blanket stitch using black thread (this way it wont show on the front side) be extra careful to make sure your stitches don’t go onto the cream wool

-stitch the snap onto the inside center of each end of your needlekeeper so that when folded in half to close you can snap it shut

-I always fill my needlekeeper with a

few of my favorite things like ribbon,

buttons, & my Eiffel tower charm.

 needlekeeper2.jpg

att00349.jpg

( the holly leaves are simply running-stitched off one side of the red wool circle as shown in the picture)

Enjoy!!!

From Mary Anne Drury Moonbeams in a Jar

November 24, 2008

Edited 11/25/08 – My schedule got messed up, so we’ll be running Mary Anne’s tutorial one more day! Look for a new project tomorrow 🙂

Please welcome Mary Anne, who will show us how to make this fabulous scarf!


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Hi everybody!  Here in Pa. it seems like we went from October straight into January’s deep freeze !!  So,  I rummaged through my pile of fleece (I call it polar fleece) and whipped up a quick and easy new scarf ….. with pockets to hold my cell phone,  tissues (for my forever runny nose in this cold weather), a couple of bucks, and my car keys ! (trying to eliminate dragging my 10 ton purse into the grocery store when I just run in for milk and cat food.)  Oh! And did I say how much I LOVE the soft, snuggly warmth of fleece ….. and all those FUN colors ….AND it’s so easy to work with ….. raw edges here I come!!! Yahoo!!

 

So, first let me show you what we’re making…..

untitled-1.jpg

 

 


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…..and here’s what you need to whip this up:

 

Fleece (body of scarf)                  ½ yd  (60 inch wide fleece)

Fleece (pockets and fringe)          11 inch x 14 inch remnant

Fleece (pocket flaps and fringe)   8 inch x 15 inch remnant

Black sewing thread

Sewing machine

#8  black perle cotton ( or black DMC embroidery floss)

Embroidery needle

2 buttons  size 1 3/8 inch


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Paper hole punch

Old CD or other small round object

Small sharp scissors

Chalk marking pencil

Rotary cutter and mat (or fabric scissors)

 

Cut Fabrics:

Body of scarf    cut 2    9 inches  x  60 inches

Pockets              cut 2    4 ½ inches x 6 ½ inches

Pocket flaps       cut 2    3 inches x 7 ½ inches

Red fringe          cut 8   ½ inch x 14 inches

Yellow fringe    cut 8    ½ inch x 14 inches

 

Assembly:   

To make rounded bottom edges on pocket flaps, trace around CD (or any small round object) with chalk pencil on bottom corners. Trim on traced line.

untitled-2.jpg

 


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Center button on flap,  ¼ inch from bottom edge of flap.   Mark left and right edges of button on flap with chalk pencil. 

 


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Draw horizontal line to connect left and right button edge marks.

 untitled-4.jpg

 


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Fold flap in half and using small sharp scissors, cut along drawn horizontal line to make button hole slit.

 

untitled-5.jpg


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Using black perle cotton (or DMC floss),  blanket stitch around button hole edges.

untitled-6.jpg

 


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Pin pocket piece on each end of scarf,  about 2 ¼ inches from bottom edge of scarf and about 1 ¼ inches from either side.   Machine stitch sides and bottom of pockets to scarf, about ¼ inch from edges.

untitled-7.jpg


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Pin pocket flaps above pockets  (top edge of pocket flap should be about 1 ¼ inch above top edge of pocket).  Machine stitch top edge of pocket flaps and about ½ inch down on either side (stitching ¼ inch from edges)

 

untitled-8.jpg


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Stitch scarf front to scarf back around all edges ,  WRONG sides together,  using ½ inch seam.

 

Sew button on each pocket front using black perle cotton and a “x? stitch .

 

untitled-9.jpg


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Using paper punch,   punch 8 evenly spaced holes through both layers of scarf at bottom edges,  right above seam.

untitled-10.jpg


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Fold fringe strips in half .  Push fold through punched hole.  Pull fringe ends through looped/folded part of fringe and gently tighten loop up to edge of scarf.    

untitled-11.jpg


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Alternate fringe colors.

untitled-12.jpg


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Ta Da !!!   You’re finished !!!  Hope you had fun and ….

                        

                    Happy Holidays !!!!

 You can visit Mary Anne’s blog here

From Beth Helfter of EvaPaige Designs

November 23, 2008

A big welcome to Beth, who is going to show us how to use our leftover bits of fabric…


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Everyone has leftover blocks and plenty of scraps sitting around their sewing room. Why not grab a few and in just a few minutes turn them into tree ornaments or custom gift tags?

 all-ornaments.jpg

Supplies:

 

·        Several UFO blocks, cut no larger than 5 ½? square

·        Scraps for appliqué shapes

·        6? square batting and backing, one per ornament

·        Beads, sequins, buttons, jewels

·        Thin ribbon for hanging

·        Allene’s Jewel It other adhesive

 

  1. Locate some UFO blocks. This is sometimes easier said than done, but once you find one you will likely find more than you ever thought you had, and you might end up in the market for a taller tree to fit all the ornaments you can make.
  2. Cut blocks down to squares or rectangles no smaller than 3 1/2? on a side and no larger than 5 ½? on a side. photo-1.jpg
  3. Decide on orientation – do you want your ornament to hang on point or straight?
  4. Decide on design. I like to stick to fairly simple and traditional Christmas shapes. Anything you can draw or cut out freehand will work. Simple triangles make great Christmas trees, a few basic petal shapes turn into a poinsettia in no time, some circles, a square, and a rectangle make a snowman with a jaunty hat. Just remember to keep your design small enough to fit within about ½? of the edge of the block.
  5. Iron fusible web onto the wrong side of whatever scrap fabrics you are going to use to make your design. Either draw your design on the fusible, or cut the design freehand. Remember, either way your finished design will be the opposite of what you are cutting from the paper side.    
  6. Fuse the design to the block, following your fusible manufacturer’s instructions.
  7. Machine appliqué around appliqué shapes. This is most easily accomplished by using zig zag or feather stitching or any other simple decorative stitch you might have on your machine. photo-2.jpg

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8. Sandwich block, batting, and backing for quilting. I like to use my 505 spray baste to put them all together.

9. Free motion or echo quilt around your appliques; these blocks are little and don’t really need all that much quilting, and are a great project to use to practice your machine quilting.
10. Trim off excess batting and backing.
11. Prepare binding; cut a strip of fabric 1 ¾? wide by approximately 19 inches long. Press in half along the long side to create a double thickness binding.
12. Using a scant ¼? seam and beginning in the middle of one side, attach binding to the front of the ornament. Flip binding to back and handsew shut.
13. Embellish your appliqué shapes with beads, buttons, jewels, sequins, and any other small shiny items you may have in your stash. I like to use Allene’s Jewel It to attach them as it adheres quickly and dries invisibly. For small beads, the easiest way to get the glue on without overgluing is to thread the bead on a pin and gently dip the pin in some glue, then press it on the ornament and slide the pin away. photo-3.jpg
14. Cut a piece of ribbon about 9? long. Glue or sew to the back of the ornament, overlapping ends slightly. photo-4.jpg

 

EvaPaige Quilt Designs, created by designer Beth Helfter, strives to give quilters freedom to make beautiful things without focusing on perfection. From her quick and forgiving patterns to her trunk show entitled “Perfection is Overrated?, Beth works hard to give quilters license to focus on “fun over fuss? in their quiltmaking.

 

Beth loves to see her designs completed and the creative licenses taken by quiltmakers when using her patterns, and welcomes photos and comments anytime at evapaigequilts@charter.net. She is a founding member of New England Quilt Designer’s Cooperative; their group blog, to which she is a frequent contributor, can be found at http://nequiltdesigners.blogspot.com. To find out more about EvaPaige Quilt Designs patterns and her workshops and trunk show, visit www.evapaigequiltdesigns.com.

 

 

 

‘Quick to Sew’ Holiday Napkin Rings by Daphne Greig

November 21, 2008


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 Please welcome Daphne Greig from Patchwork Studio –

 

Here is a fun project to make for holiday gifts – napkin rings that are quick to make, use scraps of fabric and will be used for years to come. The person you give them to will think of you each year! Be sure to make a set for your holiday table too. You could make different ones for each season. Or use a different fabric for each member of your family to identify their cloth napkin if they are re-used for a few meals. We use cloth napkins all the time to save paper and they are so much nicer. You can make your own with a fat quarter of fabric by turning all the edges under twice and topstitching. Or cut a strip off the long end and make a matching napkin ring following these directions:

 


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Materials (for one napkin ring):

 

Double sided fusible stiff interfacing(fast2fuse® or Peltex® 72 by pellon®)

            1 ¾? x 7 ½? rectangle

Outside fabric

            2 ¾? x 8 ½? rectangle

Lining fabric

            2? x 7 ¾? rectangle

One ½? to 1? button

Thread to contrast with outside fabric


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To make one napkin ring:

 

Centre the interfacing rectangle on the wrong side of the outside fabric.

 ring-step1.jpg

Fold the excess fabric over the rectangle and press in place with the tip of the iron, being careful not to set the iron on the fusible interfacing.

ring-step2.jpg

 

The corners can be folded ‘square’.

ring-step3.jpg

 

Turn under all the edges of the lining rectangle ¼? and press.

ring-step4.jpg

 

Place the lining rectangle on the fabric/interfacing rectangle, wrong sides together and press to fuse all the layers together. The lining rectangle should be slightly smaller than the outside rectangle.

ring-step5.jpg

 

Use contrast thread in your sewing machine and sew a decorative stitch along both long edges of the napkin ring. You may want to test a few stitches on scraps to see which one you like best.

ring-step6.jpg

 

Form a ring with the finished rectangle, overlap the edges about ¾? and sew the button through all the layers. Here is my napkin ring all ready for our Christmas table.

ring-step7.jpg

 

No – I don’t really have the table set now! But I will have it set before we go to my Mother’s for our traditional Christmas Eve clam chowder supper. Saves one thing to do on Christmas Day. And I polished the silver when we repainted the dining room this summer. My china cabinet had to be packed up so it could be moved and I realized how tarnished some pieces were so I decided to take care of that job well ahead of the holidays.

 

 You can see more of Daphne’s work on her website Patchwork Studio or Daphne Greig or her BLOG

 

Clothespin Star designed by Tammy Harrison, Quilt Therapy

November 20, 2008

Click Here for the PDF of this Last Minute Gift Pattern

1)  Begin by folding each of your 2? squares diagonally, into a triangle.  The, place them so that you create a star pattern and pin together:

2)  Now, using your sewing machine, stitch all the way around the triangles, to secure them together and create stabilization for the edges of your star:

3)  Finally, hot glue your star to the clothespin, then embellish with something in the center of the star.  On the back of the clothespin, glue a magnet strip so you can hang it on your refrigerator or magnetic board!

Click Here for the PDF of this Last Minute Gift Pattern

©2008 QUILTALICIOUS, LLC
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY

The Last Minute Gift Countdown: Nov 20 – Dec 4

November 15, 2008

giftcountdown08.gif

Please feel free to grab this little ornament and display it on your blog – Here is our schedule so far…

Nov 20 – Tammy Harrison, quilttherapy.com

Nov 21 – Daphne Greig,  www.daphnegreig.blogspot.com

Nov 22 –

Nov 23 – Nancy from Belle Epoque

Nov 24 – Mary Anne Drury from http://moonbeamsinajar.blogspot.com

Nov 25 – BethHelfter from EvaPaige Designs

Nov 26 – Traci from Plum Cute Designs

Nov 27 – Karen Montgomery

Nov 28

Nov 29

Nov 30 – Susana from  http://bysusuko.blogspot.com

Dec 1 – Kristin from http://seemommysew.wordpress.comDec 2 -Gudrun Erla from www.gudrun.typepad.com

Dec 3 – Karen Montgomery from The Quilt Company

Dec 4 – Bridgett from  (i have to get her blog URL)

We still have room… jump in if you want to! Email me