Archive for July, 2008

Project #1, Angela McIntyre from Laughing Cat Designs

July 21, 2008

Welcome Angela! Visit her website and her blog. Today, she brings us Wearable Fiber Art Pins….


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

I love fiber art, especially when it is wearable.  However, finding the time to make a Wearable Art jacket or vest can be a challenge.  In order to wear my fiber art creations, I had to make them smaller, more of an accent than a whole look.  So, I came up with a way to make fiber art jewelry!  Now I can look the part, with very little time and effort, and materials. Use up all those wonderful scraps!

 

With the Fiber Art Pin I can now accent my entire wardrobe in whatever color combination I want.  I can also go for whatever look I want, from folk art with wool and buttons to a very elegant Asian using silk and dynasty coins.  Whatever your look, you can make one of these fun pins in just a few hours, or even better, make several at once!

 

 picture-1.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Here is how I do it:

 

Supplies needed:

  • Fast2Fuse heavy weight (or Timtex with fusible will work) 2? – 3? square.
  • Misty Fuse
  • Fabric scraps: cotton, tulle, organza, funky fabrics, silks, etc.  anything goes
  • Fun Stuff: beads, buttons, decorative yarn and thread, doodads, Angelina fibers
  • Sewing machine
  • Beading thread and needle (I use Silamide beading thread, and a Soft Touch beading needle)
  • Appliqué pressing sheet (or Teflon pressing sheet)
  • Clear or smoke monofilament thread (I use Monopoly by Superior Threads)
  • Pin back
  • Gem-Tac adhesive

 

picture2.jpg

 

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Create the Base:

 

On the appliqué pressing sheet, fuse a background fabric to your Fast2Fuse.  This shouldn’t be your focus fabric; you may end up covering it all up with additional fabrics and ‘fun stuff’.  (The appliqué pressing sheet is used because there is fusible on both sides of the Fast2Fuse and we don’t want this stuck to our ironing boards!)

 

picture-3.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Audition different accent fabrics, organza, silk, etc on your background.  Strips, ripped, fussy cut, it doesn’t matter.  Most of the time I use free form cut fabric, torn tulle, fused Angelina fibers that are torn or cut, etc.  Use the Misty Fuse on the wrong side of your accent fabrics before you cut them up.  When cool, cut them as desired and fuse your choices to the background fabric.  (*TIP: use parchment paper and your appliqué pressing sheet to fuse the Misty Fuse to your fabrics and Angelina sheets!)

 

picture-4.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Using your sewing machine and decorative threads, stitch randomly across the fabrics to attach them and add texture.  A straight stitch is all that is needed, but sometimes it is fun to use your machine’s build in decorative stitches.  Even a basic zigzag stitch can jazz things up a bit.  Use a neutral cotton in the bobbin.

 

 picture-5.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Switch to a clear or smoke monofilament thread to add a few decorative yarns.  Simply zigzag across them with a walking foot using a long stitch (3.5 length is what I use).  Only a few inches of yarn will be needed and I tend to save leftover bits from other projects in a bag.  When I create small pieces like this, I can dump out my scrap bag of yarn and use up those little bits up.

 

   picture-6a.jpg  picture-6b.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Once all the base fabrics and yarns are added, fuse a backing fabric on.  When the piece is cool it can be trimmed to the desired shape.  Use your sewing machine to satin stitch all the way around to give a nice clean edge.

 

picture-8a.jpg   picture-8b.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

 

 

The Fun Stuff:

 

Thread your beading needle with a beading thread and knot the end.  You can pop the knot into the inside of the piece just like with hand quilting, or you can hide the knot under a piece of yarn.  Take an extra stitch where your first bead will go, to give extra security, and then you can begin stitching on beads.  First sew your accent or focus beads on, then add seed beads around them.  Be sure to either ‘travel’ between the layers, or take very tiny stitches on the back, so your threads don’t show.  (*TIP: using a busy fabric on the back will help to hide stitches!)

 

 picture-9a.jpg   picture-9b.jpg  picture-9c.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Create drops and dangles by stringing many smaller beads first, then an accent bead, then a ‘stop bead’.  Thread back up through all the beads, skipping the stop bead, and into the piece securing with a hidden knot. 

 

picture-10a.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Add as many or few beads and doodads as you wish. 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Finishing:

 

Once all the embellishing is done, you need to add a pin back.  First squeeze a line of glue where you want the pin back to go.  Open up the pin back and lay it onto the line of glue, pressing it in.  Add more glue around and over the pin back.  Allow to dry completely before wearing.  24 hours is recommended.

 

 

picture-11a.jpg   picture-11b.jpg  picture-11c.jpg

 

 

picture-12.jpg

 

Thank you Angela, these are SO cute!!! If any of you make some these, share the pictures with us. Post your pictures on your Flickr or Photobucket acct, then share the links with us in the Comments!

 

New Project tomorrow….

 

I think I forgot to mention the Prizes!!! Yup, I sure did 🙂 Leave your comments… we’ll have a drawing at the end of the Workshop and send out some prizes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Quilters Helping Quilters….

July 16, 2008

With all the flooding recently in many parts of our country, you can imagine what many sewing rooms look like. Can you imagine watching your sewing room go under the flood waters? After seeing that your family and loved ones were safe, seeing all your quilting fabric, notions, books, patterns, and goodies floating about and knowing they were ruined would put a pit of despair in anyone’s tummy.

As usual, the quilters are stepping up! I learned of this from Tammy, our quilting web guru and you can read her post on it here and here is the nuts and bolts of what we’re doing –

 QUILTERS HELPING VICTIMS:  We are keeping all the flood victims in our thoughts and our good friend Jill Reicks at Pine Needles Sewing Center in Cedar Rapids Iowa has agreed to be a clearing house for donations to assist those that lost everything.  We ask you to look about your sewing space – what do you have too much of, too many of, or just things you don’t use?Consider those that lost everything and we would ask you to send anything you are willing to part with to Jill.  She and her staff will make sure that all of these items fall in the hands of those that need them most.

After this event, I looked about my sewing room and wondered what I would do if everything in it was lost.  I would hope my first thought would be that all people were safe, but I would be very sad to loose all of my goodies.  It is a good chance for us to “play it ahead? and share with those that have lost everything. If you have anything you wish to share, books, threads, needles, patterns, notions or????

Then send to:
Jill Reicks
Pine Needles Sewing Center
1000 Old Marion Rd NE
Cedar Rapids, IA 52402
Thank you

Please, link to this post or copy/paste the information in your own blog. Spread the word! Let’s get these quilters, quilting again!

The Mimosa Shawl

July 15, 2008

I can finally show pictures and talk about the test knit I was doing! Andrea at BadCatDesigns designed this shawl, and it is gorgeous!This is the shawl being blocked (or racked as Mike calls it) lol….

mimosablocked.jpg

Here it is unblocked – such a pathetic looking little thing!
mimosaunblocked.jpg

I should really take a close-up picture for you. I used KnitPicks Palette in Cream and Grey. There are black Swarovski Crystals on the last row… hard to see from here.

Summer Workshop Update – The Schedule is posted! Are you ready?

I am writing for Associated Content

July 8, 2008

and you can read them HERE. So far, I have 3 articles published –

  1. The Trickle-Down Overflows
  2. The Art of Doing Great Laundry
  3. Learning to Love Baseball

I hope you’ll go read them and share them with your friends. I get paid by the number of page views, so read away! And watch for more 🙂

You can keep track of what I write here and even subscribe to ‘me’ so you know when something new is up!

My poor neglected blog…

July 5, 2008

is so forgiving. It never asks me where I’ve been, or what’s more important than writing here… it just sits and waits. Lovely.

Have you seen our Quilt Along? You should check this out. Rochelle Martin designed this quilt and is presenting it

ff-big.jpg

for us in 8 parts. Each month the new part is presented – totally free! Be sure to save them tho, cause once

the new part is posted, the past months part is gone and must be purchased. Join in, we’re only on the second month! If you like applique, this is something you don’t want to miss.

Would you believe I’m already working on the September issue? I usually take at least a few weeks off after the issue is done, but really didn’t this time. Yeah, you can look forward to something great in September 🙂

Last weekend we went to see the Cardinals play the Royals in Kansas City. Cardinals won. 🙂 It was fun, but quite a long day. The stadium is beautiful – first time I’ve been there.  The walk from the parking lot was long, and the aroma’s from all the BBQ’s belonging to tailgaters was enough to drive you crazy.

Tomorrow we’re off to Lake of the Ozarks to see The Outlaws in concert. We’ll be home Monday afternoon, after hitting the outlet malls 🙂  And after that, we’ll be home for the foreseeable future. No more plans that we are aware of.

How’s your summer going?