Project #1, Angela McIntyre from Laughing Cat Designs

Welcome Angela! Visit her website and her blog. Today, she brings us Wearable Fiber Art Pins….


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

I love fiber art, especially when it is wearable.  However, finding the time to make a Wearable Art jacket or vest can be a challenge.  In order to wear my fiber art creations, I had to make them smaller, more of an accent than a whole look.  So, I came up with a way to make fiber art jewelry!  Now I can look the part, with very little time and effort, and materials. Use up all those wonderful scraps!

 

With the Fiber Art Pin I can now accent my entire wardrobe in whatever color combination I want.  I can also go for whatever look I want, from folk art with wool and buttons to a very elegant Asian using silk and dynasty coins.  Whatever your look, you can make one of these fun pins in just a few hours, or even better, make several at once!

 

 picture-1.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Here is how I do it:

 

Supplies needed:

  • Fast2Fuse heavy weight (or Timtex with fusible will work) 2? – 3? square.
  • Misty Fuse
  • Fabric scraps: cotton, tulle, organza, funky fabrics, silks, etc.  anything goes
  • Fun Stuff: beads, buttons, decorative yarn and thread, doodads, Angelina fibers
  • Sewing machine
  • Beading thread and needle (I use Silamide beading thread, and a Soft Touch beading needle)
  • Appliqué pressing sheet (or Teflon pressing sheet)
  • Clear or smoke monofilament thread (I use Monopoly by Superior Threads)
  • Pin back
  • Gem-Tac adhesive

 

picture2.jpg

 

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Create the Base:

 

On the appliqué pressing sheet, fuse a background fabric to your Fast2Fuse.  This shouldn’t be your focus fabric; you may end up covering it all up with additional fabrics and ‘fun stuff’.  (The appliqué pressing sheet is used because there is fusible on both sides of the Fast2Fuse and we don’t want this stuck to our ironing boards!)

 

picture-3.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Audition different accent fabrics, organza, silk, etc on your background.  Strips, ripped, fussy cut, it doesn’t matter.  Most of the time I use free form cut fabric, torn tulle, fused Angelina fibers that are torn or cut, etc.  Use the Misty Fuse on the wrong side of your accent fabrics before you cut them up.  When cool, cut them as desired and fuse your choices to the background fabric.  (*TIP: use parchment paper and your appliqué pressing sheet to fuse the Misty Fuse to your fabrics and Angelina sheets!)

 

picture-4.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Using your sewing machine and decorative threads, stitch randomly across the fabrics to attach them and add texture.  A straight stitch is all that is needed, but sometimes it is fun to use your machine’s build in decorative stitches.  Even a basic zigzag stitch can jazz things up a bit.  Use a neutral cotton in the bobbin.

 

 picture-5.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Switch to a clear or smoke monofilament thread to add a few decorative yarns.  Simply zigzag across them with a walking foot using a long stitch (3.5 length is what I use).  Only a few inches of yarn will be needed and I tend to save leftover bits from other projects in a bag.  When I create small pieces like this, I can dump out my scrap bag of yarn and use up those little bits up.

 

   picture-6a.jpg  picture-6b.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Once all the base fabrics and yarns are added, fuse a backing fabric on.  When the piece is cool it can be trimmed to the desired shape.  Use your sewing machine to satin stitch all the way around to give a nice clean edge.

 

picture-8a.jpg   picture-8b.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

 

 

The Fun Stuff:

 

Thread your beading needle with a beading thread and knot the end.  You can pop the knot into the inside of the piece just like with hand quilting, or you can hide the knot under a piece of yarn.  Take an extra stitch where your first bead will go, to give extra security, and then you can begin stitching on beads.  First sew your accent or focus beads on, then add seed beads around them.  Be sure to either ‘travel’ between the layers, or take very tiny stitches on the back, so your threads don’t show.  (*TIP: using a busy fabric on the back will help to hide stitches!)

 

 picture-9a.jpg   picture-9b.jpg  picture-9c.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Create drops and dangles by stringing many smaller beads first, then an accent bead, then a ‘stop bead’.  Thread back up through all the beads, skipping the stop bead, and into the piece securing with a hidden knot. 

 

picture-10a.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Add as many or few beads and doodads as you wish. 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Finishing:

 

Once all the embellishing is done, you need to add a pin back.  First squeeze a line of glue where you want the pin back to go.  Open up the pin back and lay it onto the line of glue, pressing it in.  Add more glue around and over the pin back.  Allow to dry completely before wearing.  24 hours is recommended.

 

 

picture-11a.jpg   picture-11b.jpg  picture-11c.jpg

 

 

picture-12.jpg

 

Thank you Angela, these are SO cute!!! If any of you make some these, share the pictures with us. Post your pictures on your Flickr or Photobucket acct, then share the links with us in the Comments!

 

New Project tomorrow….

 

I think I forgot to mention the Prizes!!! Yup, I sure did 🙂 Leave your comments… we’ll have a drawing at the end of the Workshop and send out some prizes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

14 Responses to “Project #1, Angela McIntyre from Laughing Cat Designs”

  1. spin Says:

    COOOOOOOOL! 🙂
    I will definitely try this one out! 🙂
    Thank you for doing this! 🙂

  2. Susan Says:

    What an adorable pin! Thanks for sharing the instructions!

  3. AnniP Says:

    I have made the brooch, a fun little project, thanks for sharing, look in my blog.

  4. Amy a.k.a. dragonryder4 Says:

    Oh how cute, I can’t wait to get home from work so I can try a couple of these !!
    Amy

  5. Annette Says:

    What a clever idea. You make it seem so simple, I hope I can do it.

  6. Jenna Z Says:

    Wow!! You have solved my problem of making my own badges! Of course, fabric, timtex and satin stitch the edges! Thank you!

  7. Rachel Says:

    What a great start! We all love pretty bits and never have enough jewelry. LOL

  8. Karen C Says:

    great idea, the ideal quilters bling !!!

  9. Carol in SW Indiana Says:

    The pins are lovely. They remind me of some of the decorated hats at the Derby. Thanks for the great ideas!

  10. Tiffany Says:

    I love it! Anything that helps use up scraps and lets me play with beads is tops in my book! Thanks for the tutorial!

  11. Tara B Says:

    THis is great! I will definitely give this a try. It would be a quick fun gift for Christmas!

  12. Helz Says:

    Just Luv the Textile Art Backgrounding – Need to try…

  13. Kristi Says:

    I’ll be putting this on my to do list. What a great way to use up scraps and be artist at the same time!

  14. ulla Says:

    That’s a great pattern to follow but also to do individual variations.
    Thank you so so much.I’m going to do this during the last days of my holidays in the beginning of August.
    Ulla in the north of Sweden

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: