Archive for July, 2008

Project #11 – Donnely’s Shakeable Post Card

July 31, 2008

Welcome Donnelly! You can visit her blog here

 

How To Make Shakable Postcards

To make a shake post card I do the following most postcards are4″ x 6″ by 3/8″
thick, you may make them larger, just remember it will cost more at the post
office. Be sure to have your postcard hand stamped.
To make a shake post card I do the following for most postcards are 4″ x 6″ by
3/8″ thick

  • Things to have for all postcards

Non-acid glue stick: toothpick or skewers. It helps to use a vinyl sewing foot for
your sewing machine, but not necessary. Parchment paper or Teflon pressing
sheet. The usual sewing supplies, timtex or heavy interfacing, index cards,
batting, fabric, paper.

  • Things to use:

Fabric catalogs, gesso, modeling clay, beads, trinkets, clip art, buttons, charms,
fusible interfacing, photographs, just about anything that you can work with.
A fine tip is to use those copper dish scrubby you can by at the dollar store, cut
up in small bits, sprinkle on your postcard: use a heat guy or lay parchment
paper over and use your iron. You will have awesome looking metal in your
creation.

I make a see though template of vinyl with my cross lines drawn both at the 3″
line and the 2″ all the
way across. This helps you position your fabric or design also helps keep the card
somewhat true.
I always cut my timtex or heavy interfacing at 4″ x 6″
my top fabric at 5″ x 7″ this gives you room to work on it,
fold it under. If using fabric for the back, cut at least 5? x 7?.
My vinyl is also cut at 5″ x 7″
I lay my vinyl see through template with cross marks on it over my top fabric to
find my desired placement, a pen, pencil, marking pen to make a light mark at
the corners, fold the fabric to the back side to get a small crease on any side, flip
over, place timtex or whatever stabilizer you are using on it, make sure it is line
up. Spread glue on one side lightly glue down.

pic-1.jpg

I lay my vinyl see through template with cross marks on it over my top fabric to
find my desired placement, a pen, pencil, marking pen to make a light mark at
the corners, fold the fabric to the back side to get a small crease on any side, flip
over, place timtex or whatever stabilizer you are using on it, make sure it is line
up. Spread glue on one side lightly glue down.

pic-2.jpg

I work on my timtex. (Such as sewing)

pic-3.jpg

If you are going to make shakable card glue beads or jewels on the front, making
sure you is at least 1/4″ from the edge. Let dry.

pic-4.jpg

Now you are ready to start sewing it. Turn card over so the wrong side is facing
you, glue the corners first, and then glue end-to-end, side-to-side. Let dry
somewhat.
Place vinyl over the front, flip over, again glue corners firsts, glue one end, and
both sides, let dry. Before sewing you are going to add your beads,
confetti, what ever, once added, glue remaining end.
I use both index and cardstock for my backs, I also use fabric, and if using fabric
I glue it around an index card. Glue index card down, glue cardstock or fabric
down to this. Flip over make sure all fabric and vinyl is tucked in. Using a long
stitch or zigzag stitch around your card.
REMEMBER DO NOT USE TINY STITCHES!!!

pic-5.jpg

If you have any questions please feel free to email me at:
Donnely@downhummingbirdlane.com
Many thanks and enjoy!

Project #10 – from Brenda Mercado at Pumpkin Patch Primitives

July 30, 2008

Welcome Brenda from Pumpkin Patch Primitives 🙂 You can visit her blog here

Edited to add Templatesearly-signs-of-fall-1.pdf and early-signs-of-fall-2.pdf

“Early Signs of Fall”

frame-it.JPG

Materials Needed:
a. Fat quarter of Background fabric. I used burlap, you can find this at Walmart. Other options include Prairie Cloth, Wool, Flannel or even flat cotton…use whatever you like, it’s your project!
b. 2″x3″ scrap of wool for leaf (I used a mottled green but remember that leaves are of all shapes, sizes and colors during fall so don’t get hung up on the color; use whatever you have)
c. 8″x3.5″ Black wool for Crow (If you don’t have wool, use flannel!)
d. 7″x3″ Lt.Brown/Tan wool for pumpkin stem -curl
e. 4″x6″ Lt.Brown/Tan wool for pumpkin stem -base
f. 2″x2″ Dark Brown for Acorn Cap
g. 2″x2″ Golden Brown for Acorn bottom
h. 9″x11″ wool for Pumpkin
i. 14″x14″ Batting of your choice
j. 14″x14″muslin
Optional: wood 12″x12″ frame (Commonly used to frame Scrap booking pages; available at Micheal’s and Walmart!), adhesive spray and Foam board (AC Moore!)
Prepare materials:
1. Trace all templates onto fusible web. No seam allowance is needed. There really is no need to reverse the templates, unless you have a serious preference as to which side you want your crow to be on. I must admit that my original pattern had the crow on the other side of where my project has it. I didn’t reverse it and I like it just the same. If you choose to reverse the pattern just make sure you reverse ALL the templates, not some… (not that I have ever done that!LOL!) You may choose to remove the center of the template or leave it in. I chose to remove the middle part but if you are using the light fusible I would just leave it in.
2. Felt all wool (wash using mild soap and dry in dryer. I use fabric softener but it is not needed. I do not add a towel, I just toss it in the dryer alone. It works for me!
Assemble:
1. Layer Background, Batting and Muslin and secure. I use fusible batting but if you use regular batting just baste it. Because I used burlap and it frays I stitched all sides.

layer-background.JPG  secure-burlap.JPG

summerprojectintheworks.JPG 2. Iron the Fusible web to the back of your wool. The “back” is the “non fuzzy” side. if you can’t tell which is the wrong side/back then iron it onto the side that you like the least. This ensures that the fuzzy side, or nicest side, will be the side you will see once your project is complete!

3. Referring to the photo and making sure your project is centered in the frame opening start to fuse your wool pieces in the following order.
Note! Wool is not easy to fuse. Hence I fuse, stitch and then fuse some more. If you fuse all your pieces they will start falling off…really!
a. The Pumpkin:
This is important!!!!
When you assemble your pumpkin start from the outside moving in, make sure you overlap your pieces only about 1/4″ and play with the pieces until the pumpkin looks just the way you like it. You can also use tracing paper and just fit them exactly as I have done. DO NOT FUSE YET!

assemble-pumpkin.JPG

Now, once you have your pumpkin pieces in order then, tuck the stem into the top. Refer to picture for detail look at how I did it. Not all pumpkin pieces are under the stem, look at the picture but ultimately make your pumpkin as you like it.

tuck-in-stem.JPG

Stitch the pumpkin down before you go any further! I used a blanket stitch. DO NOT fuse anything else…just stitch down the pumpkin!
b. NOW, after your pumpkin and stem are stitched on the background move on to the crow and leaf. Make sure you put the other pieces on too to make sure you like the arrangement. Do not fuse anything else , just the crow and leaf at this time. Then stitch them on.
c. Lastly, stitch the curly stem tail and the acorn. The acorn will bridge the stem base and the curly tail.
Now Iron your project and square it.
Once everything is stitched on the background you are done! Now, you can choose to frame it as I have done by simply trimming the piece to the frame’s insert size and attaching it to foam board using a spray adhesive Or. You can trim it down and add a binding. If you choose the bind your piece add a backing to give it a finished look.
Enjoy!

NOTE: due to some technical snafu’s…. templates for this project will be available tomorrow. sorry 😦 But it’s a darn cute project and worth waiting for!! 🙂

Project #9, Patti Oakley from Batiks by Design

July 29, 2008

Welcome Patti! Visit Patti’s blog here

 

Roxanne’s Star

Designed by Roxanne Ferguson for Batiks by Design

 

logo.jpg

Block size: 6? finished
Fabric and Cutting Requirements:
• Colored Scrappy Fabrics:
o Cut 8 – 6 ½? x 2? pieces from various scraps
o Cut 4 – 3 ½? x 3 ½? squares from scraps, mark diagonal line
• Neutral Colored Fabrics:
o Cut 8 – 6 ½? x 2? pieces from various scraps
o Cut 4 – 3 ½? x 3 ½? squares from scraps, mark diagonal line
Please read all directions before starting.
1. Take 2 colored scraps (6.5? x 2.0? pieces) and sew together with a ¼? seam.
Repeat 3 more times with remaining scraps.
2. Repeat above with neutral scraps.
3. Take a 3 ½? neutral square and place it on top of the colored strips. Place so
that the diagonal line goes from the upper left to lower right. See diagram
below.

diagram-1.jpg
4. Sew on diagonal line. Trim to ¼?. Press.
5. Repeat 3 times.
6. Take a 3 ½? color square and place it on top of the neutral strips. Place so
that the diagonal line goes from the upper left to lower right.
7. Sew on diagonal line. Trim to ¼?. Press.
8. Repeat 3 times.
9. Press.
6.5 inches
10. Sew a dark and light rectangle together with triangles at opposite ends as
shown.
diagram-2.jpg
11. Sew 4 blocks together, turning them to make either a neutral star or colored
star (as shown).

block.jpg

Sample of quilt –

quilt-layout.jpg

Project #8, Susan Mark Purney

July 28, 2008

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Please welcome Susan Mark Purney, you can visit her blog here  and her website here

 

My Little Box of Secrets

 

pic-8.jpg

 

 Fabric Collage Made Fun!

 

Stiff interfacing is a great product for making a variety of three-dimensional vessels and boxes. It keeps its shape, and can be stitched through. Use paper or photos instead of fabrics, add all sorts of embellishments such as buttons and beads and be creative!

 

Supplies Needed:

 

  • 12? x 18? fusible stiff interfacing (Fast2Fuse is a good brand)
  • fabric scraps to equal a fat quarter
  • fat quarter for backing
  • variety of decorative threads-rayon, polyester, variegated, metallic
  • bobbin thread to match
  • appliqué pressing sheet or parchment paper
  • large button and wool bead for handle

 
1. Cut the scraps into small (2?-3?) pieces and layer on top of the fusible interfacing.    Overlap pieces of fabric so the entire surface is covered.
2. Cover your ironing surface with the appliqué pressing sheet or parchment   paper to keep the fusible web from adhering to the ironing board.
3. Place layered fusible on top of the sheet and cover with another sheet to keep any fusible from creeping to the top and sticking to your iron.

pic-1.jpg


4. Iron well using a dry iron to fuse all layers together. Stitch randomly across the surface of the fabric collage. Use a variety of   threads. This is a good time try out all the different stitches on your sewing machine, try different widths and lengths. Stitches should be no more than ¾? apart.

susan-2.jpg
5. Fuse the backing fabric on the reverse side of your stitched collage.
Cut the collage into the following pieces: four 4? x 6? rectangles for the sides, one 4? x 4? square for the base, one 4 1/4? square and four 4 1/4? x 1 1/4? rectangles for the lid.
6. Set your sewing machine to a medium width zigzag stitch and use the same colour thread in the top and bobbin I use cotton thread in the bobbin for strength.
Stitch all around each piece of collage twice.
7. Layout the top and bottom pieces and using a wider zigzag stitch join the pieces for the lid and for the box separately.

susan-3.jpg
8. Using doubled thread to match and a sharp needle, whipstitch the edges of the box and lid together. This is must be done by hand.

susan-4.jpg
9. Centre the button and bead on the top of the lid and stitch through all layers to secure.
pic-7.jpg

Tuck some special little secrets or surprises into the box.

 

Note: You can vary the sizes of the boxes and lid to what ever interests you. Make certain that the lid is always ¼? larger than the box so it fits on securely.

Please send me pictures of your “little boxes? and I’ll post them on my blog!

 

Are those cute or what? I’ll be making some of those, I know that for sure! Tomorrow…. Patti Oakley from Batiks by Design!

Project #7, Karen West from Thimble Pleasures

July 27, 2008

Welcome Karen 🙂 You can visit Karen’s blog here and her website here


st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Bean Mags

 

Bean Mags are refrigerator magnets made from fabric and stuffed with poly pellets and a tiny strong magnet, so they look and feel like miniature beanbags.

 

karenwest1.jpg

 

As quilters and sewers, we all have little scraps of fabric that we cannot bear to throw away. But what to make with them?  Here is a mini-craft project that helps you create something useful out of your very small scraps. In addition to loving fabric, I am also fascinated with miniatures and magnets. I make very small quilts and embed tiny magnets into the batting in the corners so they will stick to a file cabinet or refrigerator. My grandfather was a high school shop teacher, and gave me magnets to play with as a child and taught me about their amazing properties. I don’t think this type of magnet had been discovered when he was alive, but he would have loved them. My co-workers thought I had flipped my lid when I showed up in the quilt shop with these!  I stuck them on a metal cabinet near the cash register and the customers loved to play with them. (Please keep these out of the reach of small children.)

 

Supplies:

Cotton fabric cut into 1-1/4? x 2-1/2? pieces

Thread

Craft glue or glue stick (I use regular paper glue stick)

Super magnets

Poly-pellets

 

Poly-pellets are made by Fairfield and are sold at Michael’s stores. They are in the batting and stuffing section. They are similar to the little beads found in the bottom of Beanie Babies. If you don’t have a Michael’s nearby, you can order them online here. They come in a 2 lb. bag for just a few dollars. That’s enough to make a zillion Beanmags!

 

karenwest2.jpg

 

Super magnets are also called Rare Earth Neodymium magnets and are sold at some hardware stores. (they are used in woodworking). I order them online from AmazingMagnets.com. They carry hundreds of sizes and shapes, so the ones I like to use are these:

They are 1/4? diameter and 1/16? thick. You purchase 50 magnets for $6.50. 

 

karenwest3.jpg

 

 

 

Instructions:

1-Cut fabric to 1-1/4? x 2-1/2?

2-Fold fabric piece in half so the short ends meet, with right sides together. The piece will now measure 1-1/4? square.

3- Carefully sew around the sides and top of the square using a 1/4? seam and a short stitch length. (2.0) Leave a 3/4? turn hole in one side edge. See diagram. It’s tiny so watch the fingers! Back stitch at the beginning and end of your stitching to secure. Use a neutral thread color. I used red so you can see it.

4- Trim a bit off all four corners.

 

karenwest4.jpg

karenwest5.jpg

 

5-Using a small, pointed but blunt-ended object like a chopstick or a “Purple Thang?, turn the tiny pouch right side out.

 

karenwest6.jpg

 

6-Drop in 2 magnets (I like to use two for extra holding power) and about 1/4 tsp of poly pellets. I work over a small bowl in case I happen to spill.

 

karenwest7.jpg

 

6-Tuck the raw edges  of your opening down inside.

7–Using a toothpick or end of a straight pin, dab a little glue (scrape a little off the end of your glue stick) and put along the inside edge of the pouch

 

karenwest8.jpg

 

8- Pinch the fabric edges closed and let it sit for a little while to dry.

 

karenwest9.jpg

 

I don’t recommend trying to sew up the end, by machine or hand. The magnet will keep sticking to your needle, or your stitch plate (how do I know this?!)  Glue works just fine and mine have been in use on my fridge for several years without coming un-glued. Isn’t it cute?  Make another one while it dries. Then go throw them at the fridge and watch them stick!

 

Hint: To give a set of them as a gift, stick them onto something metal, like a metal spice can, otherwise they all want to clump together and they look pretty funny.  

 

Karen has many patterns available for purchase here. Many are fast, fun, crafty projects like this one.

 

Another Fabulous Project!!! Tomorrow…. Susan Mark Purney! :)

 

 

Project #6, Debbie Maddy from Calico Carriage Designs

July 26, 2008

Please welcome Debbie Maddy from  Calico Carriage Designs is her website and her blog

Needlework or Jewelry Bag

photo1.jpg

My hostess at a workshop in Angleton, Texas taught me the basics for this little bag.  Please read all directions before starting this project.

Supplies:

  • Fabric – 2 coordinating fat quarters
  • 2 yds of 1/4″ ribbon or cord
  • Disappearing marking pen or chalk
  • Sewing machine
  • Basic sewing supplies
  • Yarn needle or safety pin.

Cut a 14″ and 7″ square from each fat quarter. Place the two 14″ squares right sides together. Sew 1/4″ from outside edge on both leaving about 3″ open on one side.

photo2.jpg
Clip corners and turn right side out. Turn the open edge in 1/4″ and press all edges flat. Stitch close to the edges around the whole block. If you have an edge stitch foot, it helps to keep the stitching straight.

photo3.jpg

The top stitching will close the openings. Repeat for the 7″ squares. Use a chalk wheel or disappearing marking pen to mark a line corner to corner in both directions on the top side of the small square. Fold the large square in half and finger press in both directions to find the center. Place the small square in the center of the large square. The fabric that will be the inside of the bag should be facing up with the contrasting side of the small square facing up.

photo4.jpg

Sew on the marked lines in both directions, backstitching at the corners. Turn the squares over and measure 5″ in from each corner. Fold the corners back.

photo5.jpg

Mark a line 1/2″ from the corner edges and stitch on the lines back-stitching at the beginning and ending.

photo6.jpg

Cut the ribbon into two pieces. Thread ribbon into yarn needle

photo7.jpg

or safety pin and weave it through the channels created by the stitching. Leave tails of ribbon on one side and tie the ends together with a knot. Run the other ribbon through, leaving tails on the opposite side.

photo8.jpg

Pull the knots on both sides to draw up the square to form a small bag. The square inside will make small pockets to organize contents.

photo9.jpg

The little pouch looks like a flower when viewed from the top.

photo1.jpg

Thank you Debby! That is so darn cute 🙂

Tomorrow,  Karen West from Thimble Pleasures I hope you’re having a good time!

Project #5, Beaded Stitch Markers from Karen Gass of Cotton Spice

July 25, 2008

I’m pretty new to beading, so if I can do these… so can you!And if you don’t knit, put an earring thing on this instead of a ring. See? I don’t even know the proper words for ‘things’! 🙂

stitch-markers-finished.jpg

1 – Gather your supplies – various beads, jump rings and some 24 gauge wire.

sm-supplies.jpg

2 – Cut a piece of wire 3″ long. Slightly bend this wire in half, not all the way. Slide on a lavender bead. Make sure it’s in the middle, and then twist the wire to keep it there.

sm-one.jpg

3 – Arrange your beads the way you like them

sm-two.jpg

4 – Then, using your pliers, bend that wire a little more than 90 degrees and place a jump ring on

sm-three.jpg

5 – Using your fingers and your pliers to help out, wrap the wire around itself, to secure the beads and the jump ring.

sm-four.jpg

6 – Wrapping does take a little bit of practice, but it gets easier each time you do it. The most important thing in my mind, is to make sure the ends are not poking out to snag yarn… or hair (if you decide to make earrings)

sm-five.jpg

7 – I made 4 of these, and then made 2 smaller versions. Sometimes you need a different marker to mark the beginning of the round, so there are 2 here to choose from.

stitch-markers-finished.jpg

There you go! These are quick and easy. Oh… and they’ll be one of the prizes I’ll be giving away at the end! Be sure to leave your comments 🙂

Tomorrow…Debbie Maddy from Calico Carriage Quilt Designs

Project #4, Quilted Prayer Journal from TK Harrison of BOMquilts.com

July 24, 2008

Click here for these instructions in PDF

Click here for these instructions in PDF

 

Project #3, Stamped Fabric from Daphne Greig

July 23, 2008

!– /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:””; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –>

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

  Welcome Daphne, who has discovered a super way to make some unique fabric…

 

Stamping Fabric with Daphne

 I wanted to make a small quilt with some motifs cut from a medium-scale print.

fussy-cut.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

To accent the design I chose a purple and lavender stripe fabric but needed another print for the cornerstones of my design.

accent-stripe.jpg

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

I had an orange fabric that would do but what I really wanted was something with orange AND purple. I decided to stamp the orange fabric to have the right colour combination.

 

I chose two stamps – a spiral and a triangle spiral. They are both small stamps that would be the correct size for a cornerstone square for my sashing/cornerstone arrangement. This is the triangle stamp.

triangle.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

I like Jacquard’s Lumiere paint. It has a bit of sparkle and I chose the Pearl Violet colour. I squeezed a small amount of paint onto a paper plate and then added a few drops of water to thin it slightly.

 

 

 lumiere.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

The easiest way to apply the paint to the stamp is with a small sponge. You can see a bit of the sparkle in the paint here.

sponge.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Then dab the sponge onto the stamp, being sure that all the raised areas are evenly coated with the paint.

spiral.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}


I pre-cut the small 1½?squares for the cornerstones and then carefully stamped in the middle of each square. I was careful to press the stamp evenly to get a complete spiral. I stamped 4 small squares with the spiral stamp and the remaining small squares with the triangle spiral stamp

triangle-stamped.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

I washed the paint off the stamps right after I stamped the fabric. I used soap and water and a small brush to remove all the paint.

 washing-stamp.jpg


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

And here is the finished quilt.

finished-quilt.jpg

 

Tomorrow, we’ll be having Tammy Harrision with a Quilted Prayer Journal! Tell your friends!!

 

Project #2, Knitted Headband from Rambling Designs

July 22, 2008

Please welcome Bridgett from Rambling Designs  She is such a talented knitter, and you’ll be seeing more of her around here, believe me!


v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

First off: Thank you Karen for letting me participate in this wonderful project! What a great idea! When I got your email, I had right away numerous projects pop up in my head now to pick one and write the pattern!

It took me a while to figure out how to knit these little flowers, so they come out just the way I want them. Once that was done, I hit the ground running and could not stop myself. Headband… what now? Why, a belt of course!!!! And barrettes for my daughters hair… and and and and….

You can figure out what else one could make out of these little things. Maybe a chocker necklace? Hippie-fy your house: Make a long chain of flowers,  as a happy summer garland to spice up a window, or a favorite chair… sew some around a table cloth? Make flowers in different colors and work them around a tie back, or glue them on a Barrett. Make a flower circle just big enough to go around your iced tea glasses, to keep the fingers dry from the condensation of the cold liquid in the glass and make matching tiny flowers, to go on the drinking straw, for the summer party, to distinguish glasses…. Great for scraps: Use up bits and pieces of leftover yarn, make more than just one row and turn it into an Afghan! (I think I will try this idea next!)

Have fun, try and make the belt out of unusual materials, eg. Try using thin strips of tulle, or any other pretty fabric for the flowers. Or use cut up plastic bags, ribbon, raffia, wool (and then felt them), or whatever else comes to mind.

Soooooo many possibilities! Make them big, make them small, but most important of all: HAVE  FUN making them! 

Yarn: bits of yarn in your favorite color (I used some leftover sugar’n crème yarn I had around the house)

Needles: a size or two smaller then what matches the yarn (I used Chrystal palace bamboo needles in size US 3. The size is a bit smaller then what is called for on the ball band, with the result that the flowers are bit tighter and not so “floppy?. If you like yours floppy, use big needles)

Notions: yarn needle, piece of string in contrasting color, optional: beads to fit the yarn you are using

Gauge: not important

Time needed: the headband can be made in an afternoon; the belt might take a bit longer. It all depends on how fast you knit 😉

head.JPG

 

Notes: you have to decide for yourself, which side is the right side of your flowers. You can wear them either way, with the knit stitch side up or with the rippled purl stitch side up. I opted for the purl stitch side to be the right side (I like the texture), but attached all the flowers together with wrong sides (knit stitch side) facing. You can vary the flower size; just use different yarn or different size needles.

Abbreviations:

Co = dast on

Sl = slip stitch

K = knit stitch/es

P = purl stitch/es

Approx. = approximately

Knitted cast on method:

Start out with one slip stitch on your left hand needle.*Insert right hand needle from front to back in first stitch on needle (counting from the tip). Pull up loop, do not drop old stitch off left hand needle, sl new stitch made in front of first stitch. Rep from* as many times as instructed.

Instructions:

For headband: Take a measurement around the head where this headband will go.

For belt: take a measurement around hips and add 2 inches so the belt will sit nice and relaxed on your hips. This belt is not to hold up your pants, but to look cooooooool. J

First flower:

Co 1

Row 1: With knitted cast on method co 6 stitches (7 stitches on needle =1 base stitch and 6 cast on stitches)

Row 2: k1, put string in the contrasting color in between stitch just worked and next stitch, k5

Row 3: p6

Row 4: k7 pass second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth stitch one after the other over first stitch, now sl last stitch back on left hand needle. Insert right hand needle in marked space between the two stitches, remove marker,  sl stitch from left hand needle on to right hand needle and lift the marked stitch over the stitch in front.

This will curve the little bit of knitting. There should only be one stitch left on your right hand needles.

Row 5: Sl stitch back on left hand needle.

Rep rows 1-5 three more times, then repeat row 1-4 once.  Do not sl the stitch back on to the left hand needle.

Instead:  Make sure all petals face the same direction. With knit stitch side facing: insert the right hand needle in the base of the first “petal?, pull up a loop, and pull through stitch on right hand needle to form all 6 petals in to a ring. Cut thread and pull all the way through that last stitch.

You can tie the two ends now in a knot if you like and leave them until you are done and sew all ends in at the same time, or just sew every end in right away. 

Every following flower: Work first four petals as for first flower

Fifth petal: With one stitch on right hand needle and knitted cast on method, co 3 stitches, take previously finished flower and with the knit stitch side facing you insert right hand needle from back to front at the center of the edge of a petal and through last stitch on left hand needle. Co 1 stitch and pull through petal on needle before you put the new stitch on left hand needle, (now you should have 5 stitches on your left hand needle, the “base stitch? and the 4 newly co stitches for the new petal.) With knitted cast on method, co 2 more stitches. Proceed with rest of petal as established.

Sixth petal: With one stitch on right hand needle and knitted cast on method, co 2 stitches, , take previously finished flower and with the knit stitch side facing you insert right hand needle from back to front at the center of the edge of a petal and through last stitch on left hand needle. Co 1 stitch and pull through petal on needle before you put the new stitch on left hand needle , now you should have 4 stitches on your left hand needle, the “base stitch? and the 3 newly co stitches for the new petal. With knitted cast on method, co 3 more stitches. Proceed with rest of petal as established.

Close to ring in order to fashion flower as previously.

You will have to make sure that from now on you attach the flowers in a straight line, so look which two petals you have to attach them from here on out, so it will result in a straight chain.

If you opted for the headband: Work flowers and fit them together until chain measures 2/3 of head circumference. Proceed with next step

If you opted for the belt –version: work flowers until you reach the measurement taken at beginning, proceed with next step

Next Step:

Pick up one stitch on one end of the flower chain between two petals.

For Headband:

Row 1: K1 stitch

Rep row 1 until cord measures approx. 10 inches. Bind off as follows: pull up a loop through the stitch, cut thread and pull loop all the way through the stitch.

Rep this for other side. Sew in ends block slightly.

Or replace the knitted tie with a pretty ribbon tied in between two petals of the last flowers on each side.

For belt:

Row 1: k1 through front and back loop (2 stitches)

Row 2: k1, k1 through front and back of loop (3 stitches)

Work 3 stitch I-cord for approx. 12 inches, bind off all stitches, cut end.  You can put a bead on the end and tie a knot if you like

You can also just cut 3 pieces of yarn and braid them on the flower chain for the belt ties (remember the cut pieces have to be 3 times the length you want the finished tie to be), or just tie a few lengths of yarn to the end of the flower chain and put beads on each end. Sort of like a loooooong tassel and use it to tie the belt.

Rep this step for other side.

Weave in ends, blocking is not really necessary, enjoy!

 


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Donnelly Blue Rose was originally scheduled for today, but she was injured in a car accident. She’s getting better, but her project will be delayed until July 31.Send her your prayers and good thoughts!

Tomorrow….Daphne Greig is going to show you some awesome things to do with fabric!